P R E S S E S P I E G E L
1984
WN - Westfälsiche Nachrichten Münster
1996
RHEINISCHE POST
1998
KUNSTFORUM international
1999
MARABO Magazin, Bochum (April)
1999
WAZ - Westdeutsche Allgemeine Zeitung Nr. 72 (26. März)
1999
BIOGRAPH -Stadtmagazin Düsseldorf (Mai)
2002 WZ - Westdeutsche Zeitung (20. September)
2002 FLASH ART Kunstmagazin (November/Dezember)
2004 RHEINSCIHE POST - Feuilleton Düsseldorf (März)
2006 RUHRNACHRICHTEN (Januar)
2002 Text FLASCH ART:
Magdalena Kröner

Dorothea Breick, Düsseldorf
Gallery: Martin Bochynek

She sees them every day: Ali and Mehtap playing basketball on the square down the street. Seeing and painting are natural to Dorothea Breick. First came drawings made of expressive lines, loosely scribbled but containing all necessary information. Then came water colors – floatiang color, soft impressions, tidy arrangements. In her latest oil paintings, this student of Gerhard Richter has reached a new stage in what seems to be a combination of the two: a powerfully rendered outline, completed by the most deliberate manner of painting. These days, the neat orderliness of the earlier works gets washed away by more spontaneous-looking gestures. But the apparent impulsiveness is grounded by a unique combination of outlining and filling in, of structure and color content, embracing the canvas in all-over structure that almost leaps into abstraction.
The result is free fom hierarchies and restraints, but full of dynamics. The impression of movement from a distance might be the strongest and freshest impression in Breick´s new series, suggesting motion in Martin Bochynek´s restricted gallery space. The most punctuated strokes and subtile colors, even in corners where a diligent eye does not realize it at first, counteract the loosely drawn outlines. Precisely painted squares and patches set a solid structure, a grounding from wich one can see pure painting evolve.
Breick depicts the moment of time passing on the two-dimensional surface
more strongely than before: melting rather than freezing, as in photography. We can follow the passing of the tram, a teenager slam-dunking a basketball, bystanders applauding. In her drawings this change became visible gradually, as simple simple motifs came to starting life: a power plant, a fair, the bridges and ferries across the Rhine river. But beware of any homely notions here. The motifs are vehicles of painting rather than anything picturesque. Shape and color set the temper – and the temper has risen considerably.


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